About Us

News

For Immediate Release: March 7, 2013

Sculpture Pieces by Local Icon and Artist Wade Wharton on Exhibit

PRESS RELEASE

HUNTSVILLE BOTANICAL GARDEN                March 5, 2013
Contact:
Carol Casey
Director of Marketing
(256) 830-4447 ext. 290
ccasey@hsvbg.org

For immediate release

SCULPTURE PIECES BY LOCAL ICON AND ARTIST WADE WHARTON ON EXHIBIT
AT HUNTSVILLE BOTANICAL GARDEN BEGINNING SUNDAY, MARCH 10.

March 5, 2013 - It’s always been said that one man’s junk is another man’s treasure, and, thankfully, folks who visit Huntsville Botanical Garden during its 25th anniversary will be able to see special treasures from a local artist.

Melbourn Elswade Wharton, known as Wade Wharton, considered by many a local icon, is lending several pieces of his unique art collection to the Garden as part of its 25th anniversary celebration. His initials create his unique dragonfly signature.

For the last 10 or so years, Wharton has taken discarded items and welded, attached and nailed them together at his residence in Huntsville. He’s created everything from a praying mantis to a caterpillar to a time machine and even  eye-catching blue bottle trees. From time to time, the city of Huntsville has asked him to clean up his yard of the materials he uses, and during one of those times, the Garden staff offered to volunteer and came away amazed. “Earlier in 2012, several Garden volunteers had gone to Wharton’s house to help with a cleanup of his yard,” said Carol Lambdin, the landscape architect in charge of the Garden’s 25th anniversary celebration exhibits. “They took notice of his artwork and suggested the Garden contact him to see if he was willing to donate or loan some of his collection.” Several Garden members also attended an exhibit of Wade’s work in March of 2012 at the Huntsville Art League, and they were sold on bringing some of his art to the Garden for display during the anniversary celebration.

Wharton has also constructed, as part of the exhibit, the largest blue bottle tree found in any garden in the state, maybe the entire United States. Garden officials liked the blue bottle tree Wharton already had in in his yard, but it was impossible to move that to the Garden.

The exhibit, presented by Big Spring Environmental, opens on Sunday March 10, and pieces of his collection will remain on display for the next two years.

Garden hours are Monday-Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Garden admission rates are free for members and, for non-members, the standard rates for adults are $12 and children 3-18 are $8. Children under 3 are free.

For more information on Huntsville Botanical Garden, visit www.hsvbg.org or call Carol Casey at 256.830.4447 ext. 290. The Huntsville Botanical Garden is located at 4747 Bob Wallace Avenue in Huntsville.